You too?

The challenges of getting a just resolution to a complaint of sexual harassment in the workplace are perceived by the victim/survivor as nearly insurmountable. The perceived power of the employer machine can make it seem best to just 'shut up and get over it'. That just doesn't work. The victim/survivor has been defiled and may have to face the harasser or others that may be aware to the crime frequently. Like salt in a wound, this increases the pain, and the 'survival' action seems to be just to leave the scene. Careers and be tossed in the junk heap, dreams of better life are dashed away.

Trouble is, this makes the harassment 'ok', and it makes likely further harassment on others. That makes the victim/survivor a sort-of accomplice, by silence alone.

The me-too movement has demonstrated the near-institutionalization of sexual harassment in certain fields: the Casting Couch, the and it's corollary in any industry is a means of minimizing the power and control of the individual and potentially threatening their future in a field of endeavor.

One group formed in Sacramento, California, called We Said Enough. Their website features many instances of harassment and abuse in the California State Capitol. The common theme is that speaking up has danger to future effectiveness and employment. It is a big price to pay for justice. https://www.wesaidenough.com/stories
As this site says, “We have endured, witnessed, or worked with people who have experienced some form of degrading behavior by those with power in our workplaces. They have groped us and touched us without our consent. They have made inappropriate comments about our bodies and our abilities. Insults and gross innuendo, frequently disguised as jokes, have undermined our professional positions and capabilities. They have made promises, or threats, about our jobs in exchange for our compliance, or our silence. They have leveraged their power and positions to treat us however they would like."

Harassment has been exposed all across the world:
In a case in India, the Prime Minister (Chief Justice) was criticized for how he handled a complaint of harassment by a District Judge (HC) who was up for appointment to a higher court. The inquiry into how the complaint was handled seemed itself to become a political, jurisdictional football. The accuser said in her complaint to the PM that she was not asked any questions on her allegations by any authority from the District Court (HC) or the Supreme Court (SC).
https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/ravi-shankar-prasad-counters-sc-judge-chelameswar-with-letter-of-his-own-to-cji/story-Q44mwuVLOjRo6stu7BCQRP.html

Cases have emerged in China, Egypt, Ecuador, Kenya and Pakistan … one international organization has raised the point that “we should not only recognize that the producer’s couch in L.A. can be a dangerous place, but also imagine what it is like on the factory floor in Cairo." http://time.com/5192406/metoo-international-womens-day-care/

The media have made a big splash of the high profile cases. Hey, it sells papers, draws attention to websites, sells advertising! But what about just YOU? Are YOU up to having your face splashed all over the place, continually reminding you of the abuse you have already suffered? The harasser is typically flanked and represented by others that appear to have greater power than the victim/survivor. It is critical to have someone speak FOR the victim/survivor, someone who can stand up to the powerful forces and not be intimidated.

While the governments of the world tackle the legislatve questions, each individual case deserves it's justice. Don't stand alone.

http://lawbarron.com/
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